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Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Spices and HerbsSpices and herbs can help enhance and retain flavor in your foods while cutting back on dietary sugar, sodium/salt, and fat. When you start adding flavors to your foods with herbs and spices, you may be surprised at what you’ve been missing. Try the following food and flavor combinations to enhance a meal.

For meat, poultry, and fish, try one or more of these combinations:

Beef: Bay leaf, marjoram, nutmeg, onion, pepper, sage, thyme

Lamb: Curry powder, garlic, rosemary, mint

Pork: Garlic, onion, sage, pepper, oregano

Veal: Bay leaf, curry powder, ginger, marjoram, oregano

Fish: Curry powder, dill, dry mustard, marjoram, paprika, pepper, turmeric

Chicken: Ginger, marjoram, oregano, paprika, poultry seasoning, rosemary, sage, tarragon, thyme, anise seeds


For vegetables, experiment with one or more of these combinations:

Carrots: Cinnamon, cloves, dill, ginger, marjoram, nutmeg, rosemary, sage

Corn: Cumin, curry powder, onion, paprika, parsley

Green Beans: Dill, curry powder, marjoram, oregano, tarragon, thyme

Greens: Onion, pepper

Potatoes: Dill, garlic, onion, paprika, parsley, sage

Summer Squash: Cloves, curry powder, marjoram, nutmeg, rosemary, sage, allspice

Winter Squash: Cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, onion

Tomatoes: Basil, bay leaf, dill, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley, pepper


Tips:

  • 1 tablespoon of fresh herb = 1 teaspoon of dried herb.
  • If you are creating your own recipe, begin by trying one or two spices or herbs. The amount to add varies with the type of spice or herb, type of recipe, and preference.
  • When doubling a recipe, do not double spices and herbs only increase by 1½ times. Always taste and adjust by preference
  • There are many, many varieties of spices and herbs. Begin to experiment and find new flavors.

Blog post provided by:

Katie Foster, RDN, LD

Nutrition Services

Hannibal Regional