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Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Scheduling Exercise

Man running-EKGDiabetes management includes diet, medicine and/or exercise. Let’s talk about the latter. Did you know exercise is beneficial in lowering blood sugar? We can have the best intentions to manage our health through diet and exercise but can fall short in reaching our goals. We have to give ourselves credit- changing habits is difficult, very difficult.

For many of us, we’ve had our eating habits and exercise regimens (or lack thereof) for decades. We can’t expect change overnight.

It is agreed by health experts that Americans need at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise. That is 30 minutes per day at least five times per week.

It sounds great on paper but how do we get to this goal? Think about where you are and then think about where you want to be. Setting small attainable goals each week have been proven to be effective in reaching our “big picture” goal.

Make a list of activities you enjoy. If you enjoy exercising, you will make it a priority. If you don’t, it is easy to make excuses to skip today... this week… this month.

If you are sedentary, a goal of walking 10 minutes Monday, Wednesday, Friday this week is a great place to start. Physically writing exercise on a calendar or schedule can help making it a priority. Once you have it finished, you can cross it off your list for the day. Exercising has numerous health benefits which can help keep motivation high and for it to become habitual.

Blog post provided by:
Megan Kemp, RDN, LD


ABCs of Diabetes

Heart Healthy Food US diabetes patients have a 2-3x increased risk of heart disease. To reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, remember your ABCs.

A1C <7%
Blood pressure <140/90
Cholesterol (LDL) <100 (<70 if history of heart disease)

An A1C is a blood test that correlates with a person’s average blood glucose level over a 2-3 month period.

Blood pressure measures the pressure of blood in the circulatory system, which provides information on the force and rate of the heartbeat and elasticity of the arterial walls.

LDL “bad” cholesterol is determined through a blood test. Elevated levels are associated with an increased risk of heart disease.

Know these three numbers to better understand your risk of developing heart disease. You can reduce your risk with regular physical activity and the right foods.

  1. Eat more fruits and vegetables. Aim for 4-5 servings per day.
  2. Enjoy baked fish twice a week.
  3. Choose whole grains (more fiber). Brown rice, whole wheat bread, whole wheat tortillas are great choices.
  4. Snack on nuts or seeds four times weekly.
  5. Eat less saturated fat. Saturated fat is found in animal products. Choose skim or 1% milk over whole milk. Pick lean meats, like chicken or red meats with round or loin in the name (pork tenderloin, sirloin).
  6. Reduce sodium intake to 1500 mg sodium daily or less. If buying canned goods, choose those with a low sodium or no-salt-added label.
  7. Cut down on sugar-sweetened beverages. Choose water, unsweetened tea, or diet drinks over fruit juices or regular sodas.
  8. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate activity each week.

Visit www.heart.org

Blog post provided by:
Megan Kemp, RDN, LD


Do your heart a favor! Part 3
salmon and quinoa recipeAlthough more than half of the population is meeting or exceeding the total grain and total protein food recommendations, they are falling short of meeting the recommendations for specific subgroups, such as whole grains and seafood. In place of the usual bread, pasta or rice dishes, opt for 100% whole grains instead. These include brown rice, oats, quinoa, wheat berries, and many more. These grains are as whole as it gets and contain an array of nutrients beneficial to your health. It is recommended that 3.5 oz serving of fish be consumed at least 2 times weekly (sorry, fried fish not included!) Fatty fish such as salmon, albacore tuna, trout, mackerel, herring and sardines are a few examples that provide heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Increasing omega-3 fatty acid consumption through foods is preferable. However, you may not get enough omega-3 by diet alone. For those people with coronary artery disease and high triglycerides, talk to your doctor about supplements*.

Quinoa Pilaf With Salmon, Spinach and Mushrooms
Ingredients:
5 ounces wild salmon filets
1 tablespoon white wine or 1 tablespoon sake
1 cup quinoa
1 tablespoon olive oil
¼ large onion, diced
1 garlic clove, minced
7 mushrooms, sliced
3 bunches spinach, roughly chopped
salt & pepper to taste
Directions
1. Salt and pepper the salmon filets and sprinkle with 1 Tbsp of white wine or sake.
2. Wash and chop all the vegetables.
3. In a saucepan, place quinoa and 2 cups of water and bring to a boil.
4. Place the salmon filet with the skin side down, in the same saucepan as the quinoa, reduce to a simmer, and cover. Cook until all water is absorbed, for about 10 – 15 minutes.
5. Heat olive oil in a skillet, add onion and garlic and sauté for about 2 minutes. Add mushrooms and sauté. Finally, add spinach and sauté until the spinach is completely wilted. Season with salt and pepper.
6. When the quinoa is done, turn off the heat. Carefully remove the salmon skin and flake the salmon with a fork. Mix with the quinoa.
7. Add the vegetables and mix again. Season with salt and pepper.

Source http://www.food.com/recipe/quinoa-pilaf-with-salmon-spinach-and-mushrooms-499225

*The total number of milligrams of oil in a fish oil capsule such as 1000mg or 1200mg is not very informative. The crucial question is how much DHA and EPA each capsule contains. The label gives this information. Look for at least 250mg each DHA and EPA, and again ask your doctor if a higher dose is appropriate for you.


Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Nutrition Services
Hannibal Regional

Do Your Heart a Favor (Cont.)
organic and heart healthy eatingFebruary is National Heart Health Month. Do your heart a long-lasting favor! (Continued)

The Dietary Guidelines for America (DGA) focuses on the big picture, with recommendations to help you make choices that add up to an overall healthy eating style. Changing the way you eat is difficult but over time your taste buds will adjust and I can guarantee you will feel better! Shifting to healthier food and beverage choices by replacing typical choices with more nutrient-dense options is a key strategy supported by the DGA to improve eating styles (1). According to the DGA, typical eating patterns in the United States fall short from the recommendations. For example, about three fourths of the population has an eating style that is low in vegetables, fruit, dairy, and heart healthy oils.

Fruit and vegetable consumption should be everyone’s primary focus when eating a healthy diet (with the exception of those with renal disease). They are the most nutrient dense, low calorie, and packed with antioxidants, phytochemicals, flavonoids and fiber. Aim to fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables for both lunch and dinner with a goal of 4-5 servings per day. Fruit is a great option for breakfast, snacks and/or as dessert. Aim for at least 3 servings per day.

Dairy is another food group that overall, Americans fall short on. Research suggests that dairy may be beneficial to reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Naturally occurring saturated fat, such as that found in cheese and full fat dairy products does not affect blood lipids such as total cholesterol and LDL. There is a growing interest of research on the relationship between fermented dairy products, such as yogurt, Kefir and cultured sour milk, and CVD risk. In a group of more than 26,000 individuals, they found a significant inverse association, with the difference between the highest and lowest categories of fermented milk intake being related to a 15 percent lower incidence of CVD.

Increase fruits and vegetables:
Start small and add one serving/per day each week until you reach your goal of 4-5 servings vegetables, and 3-4 servings of fruit. Add vegetables to scrambled eggs/omelets, meat loaf, sauces, soups, and casseroles. Layer a few spinach leafs to that sandwich or wrap. Blend frozen berries with plain yogurt or Kefir. Pair fruit with nut butter or cheese for a midmorning/afternoon snack. Settle your sweet tooth with fruit after a meal.

Choose 3 Servings of Dairy Daily: Most importantly, choose fermented dairy products often such as Kefir or yogurt (Stonyfield is my favorite brand as it provides at least 6 strains of good bacteria) Aim for 1 cup daily. Pair 1 oz of cheese with fruit for a mid-morning/afternoon snack. Go for an 8oz glass of milk post-workout or as a bedtime snack.

Use Heart Healthy Oils: Use olive or canola oil in the kitchen. Sauté veggies for omelets, fajitas, casserole or stir-frys. Rather than frying foods in lard or butter, drizzle with oil and lightly pan fry. Toss vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, potatoes, cabbage and carrots with oil, salt and pepper, then roast in the oven. Make you own marinades and salad dressing with oil and vinegars!


Sonestedt, E., Wirfält, E., Wallström, P., Gullberg, B., Orho-Melander, M., & Hedblad, B. (2011). Dairy products and its association with incidence of cardiovascular disease: the Malmö diet and cancer cohort. European Journal of Epidemiology, 26(8), 609-618.
http://www.andjrnl.org/article/S2212-2672(16)31329-6/fulltext?rss=yes


Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Nutrition Services
Hannibal Regional

Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

Save a Life Campaign - Hannibal Regional

You can help us...Save A Life! Recognizing the warning signs in the first few minutes and knowing what to do is critical when someone is having a heart attack. Please “Share” so that our friends, our families and our communities are aware of the warning signs of a heart attack.

Heart attacks often start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Sometimes people affected aren't even sure what's wrong and may wait too long before getting help. Here are the most common warning signs of a heart attack:

·         Chest discomfort - Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest. The feeling usually lasts for more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back. It can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain. It also can feel like heartburn or indigestion. The discomfort can be mild or severe.

·         Upper body discomfort -  You may feel pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, shoulders, neck, jaw, or upper part of the stomach (above the belly button).

·         Shortness of breath - This may be your only symptom, or it may occur before or along with chest pain or discomfort. It can occur when you are resting or doing mild physical activity.

·         Other signs can include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

 

Chest pain or discomfort that doesn't go away or changes from its usual pattern could be a sign of a heart attack. All chest pain should be checked by a doctor. If you or someone you know is experiencing these warning signs, call 911 immediately!

 

Did you know….that men over the age of 55 have a significantly higher chance of having a heart attack or fatal coronary heart disease than those that are younger? It’s important to know your heart numbers.

 

Do you know...blood sugar levels, blood pressure, cholesterol, BMI and waistline?

Blood sugar: A1c should be less than 5.7%

Blood pressure: less than 120 over 80

Cholesterol: less than 200mb/dL

BMI: Normal weight 18.5 - 24.9

Waistline: Men - less than 40 inches, Women - less than 35 inches

 

If your critical numbers are not at the target level, work with your healthcare provider to develop a plan to reach these goals. If you do not have a cardiologist, you can make an appointment with a cardiologist at Hannibal Regional Medical Group by calling 573-629-3300.



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