Hannibal Regional Blog

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Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Produce Tips

Hannibal ProduceGrow your own:

Planting a garden does not have to be hard work. Invest in raised garden beds for easier maintenance. Potted plants work great too and can be conveniently located. Growing your own produce can be very rewarding, inexpensive and allows you more versatility and control with what you eat. You know exactly how your food was grown and where your food is coming from. It can be a great family activity, lot of fun and a great way to try new foods!

 

Buying on a budget:

Frozen fruit & vegetables are often just as nutritious as fresh, have a longer shelf life, and are less expensive. Stock up on your favorites when they're on sale, and enjoy them raw, incorporated into recipes, or in smoothies, sauces, and baked goods. “Fresh fruits and vegetables are too expensive” is often an excuse for not eating them, but the truth is, they are only expensive because they wind up getting thrown away! Don’t buy more than you can eat and have a plan as to when and how you will eat them.

 

Think before you toss:

If you have less than desirable produce that you know you won’t use, store them in a freezer Ziploc bag until ready to use. Use soft fruit that is starting to brown (bananas, pears, and apples) for baking breads, muffins, pancakes etc. Add frozen bananas and berries to smoothies or yogurt parfaits.  Add vegetables such as squash, zucchini and carrots to marinara sauce and puree for an added serving of vegetables. Use wilted vegetables for stir-fry’s, soups and stews or puree and add to sauces.


Katie Foster, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, Hannibal Regional Hospital

 


A New Meaning to Spring Cleaning

Vegetable ShoppingAfter a long winter, we often revive our home with a good spring cleaning. So why not do the same for our body with our eating habits? We all know that fruits and vegetables are good for us, yet most of us fall short of the recommended 5-9 servings per day. The simplicity of the produce section is something that no other section of the store has. Every item comes "as is", and is in its whole form. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce risk of heart disease, including heart attack and stroke, as well as protect against certain types of cancers. Fruits and vegetables are full of fiber, which helps maintain proper bowel function and reduce blood cholesterol levels. They are packed with many essential nutrients, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. The impact of fruit and vegetable consumption on our health is pretty remarkable.  Improving our eating habits can be hard, so if you currently don’t eat many fruits and vegetables, start by adding just 1 serving of a fruit and 1 serving of a vegetable to each day (1 orange with lunch, 1/2 cup sugar snap peas for a snack; ). Gradually increase the number of servings you eat per day to at least 2 fruits and 3 vegetables. Spring clean your diet by choosing more from the produce section.

 

What counts as a serving?

1 medium piece of fruit= baseball size

½ cup fresh, frozen or canned fruit

¼ cup dried fruit

½ cup 100% fruit juice

1 cup leafy greens or raw veggies

½ cup fresh, frozen or canned vegetables

½ cup 100% vegetable juice