Hannibal Regional Blog

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Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Fruit and Oat Muffins 

This recipe is a staple in our home. We often bake something at least once a week, muffins being the most popular. It is a quick grab and go breakfast, or snack. These are super versatile as you can use whatever fruit you have on hand, or a combination of fruit. It is a great way to use produce that has seen better days. Change it up by adding dark chocolate chips, dried fruit and/or chopped nuts, seeds etc. These whole grain muffins are high in fiber and contain 2 tablespoons of fruit per muffin. They also freeze nicely!

2.5 cups any fruit puree 
½ cup butter, softened
½ cup yogurt
½ cup brown sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp salt
2 tsp vanilla
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon baking powder
3 cups old fashioned rolled oats
2 cups whole wheat flour

Preheat oven to 350F.
Puree fruit until smooth. Cream butter, yogurt and brown sugar using a handheld mixer or a stand mixer. Add eggs and pureed fruit. Mix well.
Stir in salt, vanilla, cinnamon, and baking powder. Mix well to combine. Add oats and flour. Continue mixing until just combined.
Prepare 24 muffin tins with liners sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Fill muffin pans 3/4 full of batter and bake at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes.
Remove from oven and allow to cool.

Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Clinical Registered Dietitian


Whole Grain Cut Out Cookies

Happy Valentine’s Day! What a great excuse to make fun heart-shaped sugar cookies. Making cookies at home allows for more wholesome ingredients, and is a great way to make memories with loved ones.  This recipe is a favorite of mine, especially because of the little hands that help make it. These cookies are made with hearty oats and whole wheat pastry flour. They are so good, they don’t even need frosting! 

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 c. butter 
  • 3/4 c. packed brown sugar 
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 c. oats, chopped fine in blender
  • 2-1/4 c. whole wheat pastry flour OR whole wheat white flour
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. baking powder

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. In a large mixing bowl, beat the sugar and butter together and then add the egg and vanilla. Beat until smooth.
  2. Add the oats, flour, cinnamon, salt, and baking powder and beat until the dough comes together.
  3. Divide the dough into two pieces, wrap in wax paper and refrigerate for about 20 minutes.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and grease (or line with parchment paper) 2 baking sheets.
  5. Remove one dough ball at a time, roll out about 1/4″ thick, cut into shapes and place on cookie sheets close together, because they don’t spread. Re-roll as needed to use up the dough.
  6. Bake the first sheet while rolling the dough for the second sheet. Bake the cookies about 8-9 minutes for thicker cookies (if you’ve rolled them thinner, they only need to bake 6-8 minutes). Set a timer! 
  7. Remove the cookies to a rack to cool before decorating.

Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Clinical Registered Dietitian


Magnesium rich diet HEALTH ROLES

Magnesium is needed in biochemical reactions, including energy production, nutrient metabolism, fatty acid and protein synthesis, transmission of nerve and muscle impulses, glucose control, blood pressure regulation and transport of calcium and potassium ions. Higher levels of serum magnesium have been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Evidence supports an inverse relationship between dietary intake of magnesium and risk of Type 2 diabetes. One large cohort study showed magnesium intake may aid in preventing pancreatic cancer.

 

SOURCES OF MAGNESIUM

Magnesium is widely available in plant and animal foods and often is included in fortified foods and enriched grains. Soil health can impact the amount of magnesium in foods.

Table

Food Sources   Rating
1 ounce dry roasted almonds 80mg Excellent
1/2 cup boiled spinach 78mg Excellent
1/4 cup oil roasted peanuts 63mg Good
1 cup soymilk 61mg Good
2 slices whole-wheat bread 46mg Good
1 cup cubed avocado 44mg Good
1/2 cup cooked brown rice 42mg Good
1 cup low-fat plain yogurt 42mg Good
Fortified breakfast cereals 40mg Good

Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD