Hannibal Regional Blog

rss

Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Tips for Adding Fiber to Your Eating Plan
Foods High In FiberWanting to get some more fiber in your diet? Consider these simple tips:
• Slowly increase the amount of fiber you eat to 25 to 35 grams per day.
• Check the Nutrition Facts labels and try to choose products with at least 3 g dietary fiber per serving.
• Compare food labels of similar foods to find higher fiber choices. On packaged foods, the amount of fiber per serving is listed on the Nutrition Facts label.
• Choose fresh fruit and vegetables (skin on!) instead of juices.
• Have brown or wild rice instead of white rice.
• Eat the skin when having potatoes.
• Enjoy a variety of grains. Good choices include barley, oats, farro, kamut, and quinoa. • • Look for choices with 100% whole wheat, rye, oats, or bran as the first or second ingredient. Popcorn is another good choice (air-popped or lightly buttered)!
• When baking, use whole wheat pastry flour. You can use it to replace some white or all-purpose flour in recipes.
• Enjoy beans more often! Batch cook dried beans and freeze in smaller portions, then add to casseroles, soups/stews, taco meat, pasta salad and salads. Beans also make a great finger food for babies (age appropriate).
• Drink plenty of fluids. Fluid helps your body process fiber without discomfort.


Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Nutrition Services
Hannibal Regional

Do Your Heart a Favor (Cont.)
organic and heart healthy eatingFebruary is National Heart Health Month. Do your heart a long-lasting favor! (Continued)

The Dietary Guidelines for America (DGA) focuses on the big picture, with recommendations to help you make choices that add up to an overall healthy eating style. Changing the way you eat is difficult but over time your taste buds will adjust and I can guarantee you will feel better! Shifting to healthier food and beverage choices by replacing typical choices with more nutrient-dense options is a key strategy supported by the DGA to improve eating styles (1). According to the DGA, typical eating patterns in the United States fall short from the recommendations. For example, about three fourths of the population has an eating style that is low in vegetables, fruit, dairy, and heart healthy oils.

Fruit and vegetable consumption should be everyone’s primary focus when eating a healthy diet (with the exception of those with renal disease). They are the most nutrient dense, low calorie, and packed with antioxidants, phytochemicals, flavonoids and fiber. Aim to fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables for both lunch and dinner with a goal of 4-5 servings per day. Fruit is a great option for breakfast, snacks and/or as dessert. Aim for at least 3 servings per day.

Dairy is another food group that overall, Americans fall short on. Research suggests that dairy may be beneficial to reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Naturally occurring saturated fat, such as that found in cheese and full fat dairy products does not affect blood lipids such as total cholesterol and LDL. There is a growing interest of research on the relationship between fermented dairy products, such as yogurt, Kefir and cultured sour milk, and CVD risk. In a group of more than 26,000 individuals, they found a significant inverse association, with the difference between the highest and lowest categories of fermented milk intake being related to a 15 percent lower incidence of CVD.

Increase fruits and vegetables:
Start small and add one serving/per day each week until you reach your goal of 4-5 servings vegetables, and 3-4 servings of fruit. Add vegetables to scrambled eggs/omelets, meat loaf, sauces, soups, and casseroles. Layer a few spinach leafs to that sandwich or wrap. Blend frozen berries with plain yogurt or Kefir. Pair fruit with nut butter or cheese for a midmorning/afternoon snack. Settle your sweet tooth with fruit after a meal.

Choose 3 Servings of Dairy Daily: Most importantly, choose fermented dairy products often such as Kefir or yogurt (Stonyfield is my favorite brand as it provides at least 6 strains of good bacteria) Aim for 1 cup daily. Pair 1 oz of cheese with fruit for a mid-morning/afternoon snack. Go for an 8oz glass of milk post-workout or as a bedtime snack.

Use Heart Healthy Oils: Use olive or canola oil in the kitchen. Sauté veggies for omelets, fajitas, casserole or stir-frys. Rather than frying foods in lard or butter, drizzle with oil and lightly pan fry. Toss vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, potatoes, cabbage and carrots with oil, salt and pepper, then roast in the oven. Make you own marinades and salad dressing with oil and vinegars!


Sonestedt, E., Wirfält, E., Wallström, P., Gullberg, B., Orho-Melander, M., & Hedblad, B. (2011). Dairy products and its association with incidence of cardiovascular disease: the Malmö diet and cancer cohort. European Journal of Epidemiology, 26(8), 609-618.
http://www.andjrnl.org/article/S2212-2672(16)31329-6/fulltext?rss=yes


Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Nutrition Services
Hannibal Regional

Tags

chicken Dietitians Dietition Eating Right freezer meals healthy foods Healthy Living Heart Health muffins Nutrition prepared recipes 911 active Activities Alzheimer's Disease appetizer appetizers Apples attentive physicians Auxiliary Awards Awareness back to school baking barley bbq beauty sleep Better Sleep blood pressure blood sugar BMI brain breakfast brussel sprouts busted butternut squash calories candy Carbs Cardiology chicken child development childbirth children chili cholesterol clean eating coconut oil cooking cranberry sauce cucumber dairy Daylight Saving Time Daylight Savings dessert dessert hummus diabetes diabetes alert day Diabetes Center Diebetes diet Dietary dietitian Dietitians digestive health doctor and patient relationship Doctors easter easter egg easy eat better eating Eating Right eggnog eggs exercise fajitas fall fiber flavoring Food food safety Foot Care fruits General gi tract Goals Grocery Shopping Guiding You To BETTER guilt free gut health gut-brain connection halloween candy hannibal regional happy health Health Living healthy healthy eating healthy food healthy living healthy recipe heart attack heart disease heart health heart health numbers Heart Healthy heart healthy oils helping those in need high fiber diet holiday holiday swaps holiday treat hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia kale less than 100 calories living healthy lowcalorie lunch magnesium magnesium deficiency management meal planning meal prep meals meat meatloaf mexican brown rice mini meatloaf myths New Year New Years Resolutions November nutrient dense food nutrition Orthopedics physical therapy picnics plant based nutrition poppy seeds prepared preparing protein psl pumpkin pie pumpkin spice pumpkin spice latte Quality quick quick and easy quick and healthy quinoa recipe recipes risk roasted chicken and vegetables salad dressing salmon salsa scholarship program school side dish sleep Sleep Apnea smoothie smoothie recipe snack snacks soup southwestern speech therapy spinach and artichoke dip Spine Spring Forward spring peanut pad thai substitutes sugar Summer Sunshine super bowl; Surgery sweet potatoes Thanksgiving tips toe walking truths ultimate salad vacations vegetables Volunteering warning signs weight control Weight Management wellness whole grain