Hannibal Regional Blog

rss

Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Halloween Treats & Diabetes

While Halloween is a difficult holiday for those with dietary restrictions, it can still be a fun holiday! Ideally, those diagnosed with diabetes want to keep their 1-3 daily snacks to 15-30 grams of carbohydrate. The chart below was created to help guide you to better eating this holiday. Rather than feeling deprived this Halloween and trying to avoid all candy, use this chart as a guide. Pick your favor candy or chocolate and make note of the correct portion size. Often, we realize we are happy with a smaller portion when we allow ourselves to savor it. And the more planning we do ahead of time in regards to our meals and snacks, the more likely we are going to make better choices. If you were limited to 15-30 grams of carbohydrate for a snack, what would you choose?

Portion/ Candy Calories Carbohydrates
Candy corn, 10 pieces 80 18 grams
Gum drops, 6 80 18 grams
Gummy bears, 10 85 22 grams
Jelly beans, 10 large or 25 small 100 26 grams
Nibs, cherry, 20 pieces 100 20 grams
3 Twizzlers from 5 oz package 100 26 grams
Starburst, 5 pieces 100 21 grams
Hi-C orange slices, 2 slices 100 25 grams
Jolly Rancher, 2 pieces 70 11 grams
Milk Duds, 7 pieces 90 14 grams
Mily Way, snack bar 75  12 grams
Risen's, 2 pieces 85 14 grams
Reese's bites, 8 pieces 100 12 grams
100 Grand Bar, fun size 100 15 grams
Kit Kat minature 50 6 grams
Nestle Crunch bar, fun size 50 9 grams
Butterfinger, fun size 80 13 grams
Heath Bar, snack size 50 9 grams
Baby Ruty. fun size 80 12 grams
Snickers fun size 80 10 grams
Hershey's Good and Plenty snack size box 60 14 grams
Hershey's Good and Fruity snack size box 60 15 grams
Hershey's Hug or Kiss 25 3 grams
Almond Joy, snack size 90 10 grams
Tootsie roll pop 60 15 grams
M&Ms, peanut butter, 10 pieces 100 13 grams
M&Ms, plain, 30 pieces 100 15 grams

 

Blog post provided by:
Megan Kemp, RDN, LD
Outpatient Dietitian
Weight Management & Diabetes Center

 


Low Blood Glucose

Hypoglycemia means your blood glucose is too low. Because a drop in blood sugar can happen quickly, it is recommended to always have simple carbohydrate snacks available to correct blood glucose. You might have sweating or cold, clammy skin, dizziness, shakiness, or tingling feeling, fast heartbeat, headache, confusion or irritability. If you are feeling any of these symptoms, always check your blood glucose right away. If it is too low:

1. Eat or drink 15 grams of fast-acting carbohydrate (1/2 cup fruit juice, 3-4 glucose tablets)

2. Recheck blood glucose again after 15 minutes. If it is still low, repeat Step 1. Check again after another 15 minutes. If it is still low, contact your healthcare provider immediately.

3. Once your blood sugar rises, eat a small snack if your next meal is not in the next 30-60 minutes.

15-grams of Carbohydrate Snacks:

  • 1 medium fruit
  • 6 oz light yogurt
  • 3 cups popcorn
  • 4 small gingersnaps
  • 5 vanilla wafers
  • 1 ounce pretzels
  • 10 baked potato or tortilla chips
  • 6 saltines
  • 3 squares graham crackers
  • 1 granola bar

Reference: American Diabetes Association (2016). Living Well With Diabetes. (n.p.)


Complications of Diabetes

The full impact of diabetes is often overlooked. While some individuals with diabetes have physical symptoms and noticeable signs of high blood sugar, some are asymptomatic (showing no symptoms). High blood glucose damages both large and small blood vessels. Damage to these vessels can lead to complications that affect the whole body.

Stroke, heart attack, nerve damage (neuropathy), eye disease (retinopathy), kidney problems (nephropathy) and peripheral arterial disease are some of the complications of diabetes. You can reduce your risk of complications by controlling your blood glucose. Blood sugars can be managed through dietary adjustments, increasing physical activity and/or taking medication/insulin as prescribed. Your health care team will work with you to create an individualized plan to meet your needs.

Hannibal Regional Weight Management and Diabetes Center has two outpatient dietitians to help guide you to better eating. Contact us by phone at 573-629-3382 or by email at megan.kemp@hrhonline.org to learn more about our nutrition services and/or to schedule an appointment.


High Blood Glucose

Hyperglycemia means your blood sugar is too high. You might experience increased thirst, increased need to urinate, increased tiredness and/or blurred vision. If you feel any symptoms, check your blood glucose right away. If it is too high:

1. Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated.

2. If you take insulin, you may need to adjust your medication. Regularly follow-up with your healthcare provider to better manage your blood sugar. Self-medication is not recommended. Always ask your healthcare provider if wanting to make any changes to medication doses.

3. Check blood sugars at least every 4 hours to make sure your glucose is going down. Call your healthcare provider if it doesn’t go down after two checks, or if symptoms get worse.

Reference: American Diabetes Association (2016). Living Well With Diabetes. (n.p.)


Diabetic Friendly Breakfast Ideas

Healthy Breakfast For most busy individuals and families, meal planning is not always high priority. Quick and convenient foods can be high in fat and calories but they can also be well-balanced and nutritious. Most women need about 3 carbohydrate choices per meal while most men need about 4 carb choices per meal. Keeping this in mind during meal planning can guide you to better eating. Here are some diabetic friendly meal ideas that require little to no preparation or cooking.

Breakfast Meal Ideas:

(1.5 cup) High Fiber Cereal = 2 Carbs
(1 cup) Skim or 1% Milk = 1 Carb
(1) Hard-Boiled Egg

(2) Whole Wheat Toast = 2 Carbs
(2 tsp) Whipped or Light Butter (Made with Canola or Olive Oil)
(1) Greek Yogurt = 1 Carb
(1 Cup) Berries = 1 Carb

(1 Packet) Flavored Oatmeal = 2 Carbs
(1/4 cup) Nuts or (2 Tbsp) Peanut Butter
(1) Small Banana or (1 Cup) Sliced Strawberries or Blueberries = 1 Carb

(2) Whole Wheat Toast = 2 Carbs
(2 Tbsp) Peanut Butter
(1) Small Banana = 1 Carb

(2) Whole Wheat Toast = 2 Carbs
(1 Slice) Cheese
(1) Scrambled Egg
(1) Tomato
(1) 5.3 oz Light Yogurt = 1 Carb

Blog post provided by:
Megan Kemp, RDN, LD


Tags

chicken Dietitians Dietition Eating Right freezer meals healthy foods Healthy Living Heart Health muffins Nutrition prepared recipes 911 active Activities Alzheimer's Disease appetizer appetizers Apples attentive physicians Auxiliary Awards Awareness back to school baking barley bbq beauty sleep Better Sleep blood pressure blood sugar BMI brain breakfast brussel sprouts busted butternut squash calories candy Carbs Cardiology chicken child development childbirth children chili cholesterol clean eating coconut oil cooking cranberry sauce cucumber dairy Daylight Saving Time Daylight Savings dessert dessert hummus diabetes diabetes alert day Diabetes Center Diebetes diet Dietary dietitian Dietitians digestive health doctor and patient relationship Doctors easter easter egg easy eat better eating Eating Right eggnog eggs exercise fajitas fall fiber flavoring Food food safety Foot Care fruits General gi tract Goals Grocery Shopping Guiding You To BETTER guilt free gut health gut-brain connection Halloween halloween candy hannibal regional happy health Health Living healthy healthy eating healthy food healthy living healthy recipe heart attack heart disease heart health heart health numbers Heart Healthy heart healthy oils helping those in need high fiber diet holiday holiday season holiday swaps holiday treat hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia kale less than 100 calories living healthy lowcalorie lunch magnesium magnesium deficiency management meal planning meal prep meals meat meatloaf mexican brown rice mini meatloaf myths New Year New Years Resolutions November nutrient dense food nutrition Orthopedics physical therapy picnics plant based nutrition poppy seeds prepared preparing protein psl pumpkin pie pumpkin spice pumpkin spice latte Quality quick quick and easy quick and healthy quinoa recipe recipes risk roasted chicken and vegetables salad dressing salmon salsa scholarship program school self care side dish sleep Sleep Apnea smoothie smoothie recipe snack snacks soup southwestern speech therapy spinach and artichoke dip Spine Spring Forward spring peanut pad thai substitutes sugar Summer Sunshine super bowl; Surgery sweet potatoes Thanksgiving tips toe walking truths ultimate salad vacations vegetables Volunteering warning signs weight control Weight Management wellness whole grain