Hannibal Regional Blog

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Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Here are 12 Risk Factors for Developing Heart Disease
Cardiology Hannibal, MOWhile many of the risk factors for heart disease listed below are well known, some may surprise you.  Read through the list and see how many apply to you. If you have more than a couple, then it may be time to see a cardiologist and find out what you can do to reduce your risk. 


Risk factors for developing heart disease include:

  • Age. Aging increases your risk of damaged and narrowed arteries, as well as weakened or thickened heart muscle.
  • Gender. Men are generally at greater risk of heart disease. However, women's risk increases after menopause.
  • Family history. A family history of heart disease increases your risk of coronary artery disease, especially if a parent developed it at an early age (before age 55 for a male relative, such as your brother or father, and 65 for a female relative, such as your mother or sister).
  • Smoking. Nicotine constricts your blood vessels, and carbon monoxide can damage their inner lining, making them more susceptible to atherosclerosis. Heart attacks are more common in smokers than in non-smokers.
  • Poor diet. A diet that's high in fat, salt, sugar and cholesterol can contribute to the development of heart disease.
  • High blood pressure. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can result in hardening and thickening of your arteries, narrowing the vessels through which blood flows.
  • High cholesterol levels. High levels of cholesterol in your blood can increase the risk of formation of plaques and atherosclerosis.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease. Both conditions share similar risk factors, such as obesity and high blood pressure.
  • Obesity. Excess weight typically worsens other risk factors.
  • Physical inactivity. Lack of exercise also is associated with many forms of heart disease and some of its other risk factors as well.
  • Stress. Unrelieved stress may damage your arteries and worsen other risk factors for heart disease.
  • Poor hygiene. Not regularly washing your hands and not establishing other habits that can help prevent viral or bacterial infections can put you at risk of heart infections, especially if you already have an underlying heart condition. Poor dental health also may contribute to heart disease.
     
    Heart disease, detected early, can be improved — or even prevented — by making certain lifestyle changes. Call today and make an appointment to see a cardiologist in a heartbeat. Hannibal Regional Medical Group’s Cardiology Team accepts patients in a heartbeat because we put patients first. No referral needed. When it comes to matters of the heart, our compassion and clinical expertise go hand in hand. We believe in guiding you to BETTER.
     
    If you are concerned about your risk for heart disease, Call 573-629-3300, to schedule your appointment with a cardiologist.

New Doctors at Hannibal Regional
The Hannibal Regional Healthcare System is excited to welcome four new physicians to the Hannibal Regional Medical Group. As part of the Hannibal Regional Healthcare System, the Hannibal Regional Medical Group is a growing multi-specialty physician group continuing to expand primary and specialty care services to meet the health needs of northeast Missouri. With 42 providers including physicians and nurse practitioners, we offer services ranging from general family practice to specialized medical needs. Our dedication to guiding you to better keeps us growing and expanding our expertise through finding new physicians that are highly competent in their fields. Our newest physicians will be joining our Pulmonology, and Internal Medicine specialties this June. 

Sivatej Sarva, MDSivatej Sarva, M.D., Ph.D.

“I come from a small coal mining town in south India. Resources were inadequate for the management of many lung diseases like tuberculosis, COPD and lung cancer which were common in our town,” Dr. Sarva explained to us. “Many of my childhood friends became coal miners because the bread earners in their family were already sick and the burden of supporting their family fell on them too early. Because of seeing these circumstances, I spent all of my life working towards becoming an expert in treating these lung problems which are not limited to my home town but prevalent in communities across the world. Every day I treat a patient and make them breathe better, I feel like I have not only made the quality of life of that patient better but also helped in reducing the emotional and financial burden of a family. That's why I love what I do and wake up every day excited to meet patients and their families.” Sivatej Sarva received his Ph. D. in Molecular Sciences from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in 2008. He then went on to participate in a rotating fellowship in Mycobacterial and Respiratory Infectious Diseases in 2009 at National Jewish Health in Denver, Colorado. From there, Dr. Sarva practiced in a fellowship in Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine from 2011 - 2014. He is board certified in Pulmonary Medicine as well as Critical Care Medicine. He will be accompanying Dr. Pranav Parikh, M.D., in Pulmonology. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Sarva, call (573) 629-3400.

Hassan Behniay, MDHassan Behniay, M.D.

Dr. Hassan completed his undergraduate magna cum laude from the University of Toledo, and completed his medical schooling from the University of Toledo Medical Center.  After finishing  his residency in 2009, he then went on to practice at the Family Health Centers in Kentucky and Mississippi. “Visiting the Hannibal community, I found it nice, friendly, and a quiet environment to raise my young children, far from the anxiety and problems of a big city,” Dr. Hassan told us. He also stated, “I have joined the Hannibal Regional Medical Group with great excitement because I found it an updated and well-equipped organization, with excellent supporting staff. This helped to show me my ultimate potential as a physician to have a positive impact on the health of the Hannibal community in general. Through various preventive health care and services at Hannibal Regional Hospital, I am sure we will achieve the common goal of improved health of the Hannibal community.” While practicing here at Hannibal Regional, Dr. Hassan Behniay would prefer to be referred to as Dr. Hassan to lessen confusion between him and his older brother. He will be accompanying John Greving, DO, and Kim Peters, ANP-BC, in Internal Medicine. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Hassan, call (573) 629-3400.

Hossein Behniaye, MDHossein Behniaye, M.D.

Dr. Behniaye, graduated from medical school at the University of Toledo in 2007. From there he went on to his residency at the Toledo Hospital from 2007 - 2010. After completing his residency, Dr. Behniaye, went to practice at the Southeast Mississippi Rural Health Initiative, Inc.“As a physician I have the privilege, and with it enormous responsibility and challenge, of providing the best, the safest, the most compassionate and individualized medical care for my patient,” Dr. Behniaye explained when we asked him why he loves his profession. He went on to elaborate, “as such I could also affect the lives of my patient’s current and future generations. Such challenges, each with varying degrees of investigation and care, provide me with a fulfilling and satisfying life as it paves the road of my contribution to the betterment of humankind beyond and above my lifetime.”  He will be accompanying Adam Samaritoni, DO, and Kim Shaw, FNP-BC, in Family Practice. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Behniaye, call (573) 629-3400.

Fruit and Vegetable Challenge

Fruits and Vegetables HannibalFruit and Vegetable Challenge

The past several articles have been all about the benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption. Challenge yourself to eat more fruits and vegetables! Cut out the chart below and hang it on your fridge for 1 week. Choose more fruit and vegetables with meals, or as a snack, and check off the serving eaten as you go! Can you meet the recommended 5-9 servings a day?

 

1 piece fruit

1 piece fruit

½-1 cup veg.

½-1 cup veg.

½-1 cup veg.

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday

 

 

 

 

 

 

What counts as a serving?

1 medium piece of fruit= baseball size

½ cup fresh, frozen or canned fruit

¼ cup dried fruit

½ cup 100% fruit juice

1 cup leafy greens or raw veggies

½ cup fresh, frozen or canned vegetables

½ cup 100% vegetable juice


Avoiding Swimmer Foot Problems

Hannibal Foot CareSwimming is typically thought of as a summer activity, but if you’re a regular or competitive swimmer, you aren’t confined to just those few months. Indoor pools makes it possible for you to be in the water all year round, allowing you to stay in shape and enjoy the sport of swimming.

Although swimming is a low-impact activity, you could still experience foot or ankle pain. Swimmers need healthy feet to push them through the water and foot or ankle pain could be just as debilitating to a swimmer as any other athlete. There are many ways that swimmers put a strain on their feet and ankles - jumping off the blocks, pushing off the walls with flip turns, and the constant pointing and flexing of your toes. Those who have experienced foot cramps while swimming can understand their crippling effects. Some common foot and ankle issues that swimmers face are: tendonitis on the top of the foot and in the Achilles which could lead to heel issues, pain on top of the foot, and ankle discomfort. All pools, both indoor and outdoor, can be perfect environments for infections like athlete’s foot and fungal nails to take root.

You can avoid these foot problems by taking care of your feet:

  • Stretch and warm up
  • Condition your feet 
  • Exercising on land as well as in the pool will build up the strength of your feet
  • Don’t walk barefoot
  • Use antifungal precautions
  • Dry off your feet immediately, treat with antifungal spray, and wear clean socks

When you invest in the care of your feet, you are less likely to end up with foot and ankle problems or even unpleasant infections of the toes. However, if you do experience any kind of pain or discomfort when you are swimming or notice an infection flaring up, call Dr. Cline at Hannibal Regional Medical Group, (573) 629-3500.


Food Waste and The Environment

Food Waste HannibalMany consumers are concerned about the use of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO’s), antibiotic use in animals, and whether to buy organic vs non-organic. Many worry about certain diseases, cancer and illness. Yet very few of us consider the amount of wasted food in our world on a given day and the consequences that follow. An estimated 9 million people die each year (1 every 4 seconds) due to hunger and malnutrition. Approximately 1 billion people don’t have enough food. In 2010, 48.8 million Americans lived in food-insecure households. Yet the statistics on food waste are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous.

The Waste:
• An estimated 1.3 billion tons of edible food is wasted worldwide
• In the USA, approximately 40% of the food supply is wasted, equaling more than 20 pounds of food per person per month.
• In 2010, nearly 34 million tons of food was wasted in the USA - enough to fill the Empire State Building 91 times.
• Fruits and vegetables, along with roots and potatoes have the highest wastage rate (yet the average person does not consume the recommended amount of fruits/vegetables).
• Annually, consumers in rich countries waste almost as much food as the entire net food production of sub-Saharan Africa
• A single restaurant in the U.S. can produce approximately 25,000 to 75,000 pounds of food waste in a year
• In processing New York City’s waste alone, garbage trucks make 250,000 trips throughout the city and the same number of long hauls out of state…the average garbage truck, with its frequent stops and idling, gets about 3 miles per gallon.
• “A more recent estimate by Kevin Hall, a researcher at the National Institute of Health, found that a quarter of the food we squander would provide three meals per day for 43 million people. What’s more, it would yield enough to lift 430 million Americans, out of hunger.”
• Worldwide, we are estimated to grow by 2-2.5 billion by 2050, that’s an increase of 75million people a year. We all need to eat, and need an estimated 60-80% more food by 2050. People worry how agriculture is going to feed our growing population, when so many are already starving. Rather than waiting on an answer, maybe we should look at our food waste instead?

The Cost:
• Food losses and waste amounts to roughly $680 billion in industrialized countries and $310 billion in developing countries.
• Food loss costs a family of four at least $589.76 annually.

The Environment:
• Food waste leaves a big carbon footprint, an estimated 3.3 billion tons of CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere each year. This contributes to global warming and climate change
• Food waste that goes to the landfill breaks down anaerobically and produces methane; methane is 21 times more potent than CO2 as a greenhouse gas.
• Every ton of food wasted results in 3.8 tons of greenhouse gas emissions.
• Food waste means inefficiently used water, land and energy, which in turn leads to a diminished natural ecosystem and the services provided by.
• Less than 3% of food waste was composted in 2010. (Environmental Protection Agency). Is this as good as we can do?

References: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Economic Research Services, USDA Economic Research Service, FaceTheFactsUSA.org, Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP), Green Restaurant Association, American Wasteland, Environmental Protection Agency, University of Arizona