Hannibal Regional Blog

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Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


Produce Tips

Hannibal ProduceGrow your own:

Planting a garden does not have to be hard work. Invest in raised garden beds for easier maintenance. Potted plants work great too and can be conveniently located. Growing your own produce can be very rewarding, inexpensive and allows you more versatility and control with what you eat. You know exactly how your food was grown and where your food is coming from. It can be a great family activity, lot of fun and a great way to try new foods!

 

Buying on a budget:

Frozen fruit & vegetables are often just as nutritious as fresh, have a longer shelf life, and are less expensive. Stock up on your favorites when they're on sale, and enjoy them raw, incorporated into recipes, or in smoothies, sauces, and baked goods. “Fresh fruits and vegetables are too expensive” is often an excuse for not eating them, but the truth is, they are only expensive because they wind up getting thrown away! Don’t buy more than you can eat and have a plan as to when and how you will eat them.

 

Think before you toss:

If you have less than desirable produce that you know you won’t use, store them in a freezer Ziploc bag until ready to use. Use soft fruit that is starting to brown (bananas, pears, and apples) for baking breads, muffins, pancakes etc. Add frozen bananas and berries to smoothies or yogurt parfaits.  Add vegetables such as squash, zucchini and carrots to marinara sauce and puree for an added serving of vegetables. Use wilted vegetables for stir-fry’s, soups and stews or puree and add to sauces.


Katie Foster, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, Hannibal Regional Hospital

 


Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

Save a Life Campaign - Hannibal Regional

You can help us...Save A Life! Recognizing the warning signs in the first few minutes and knowing what to do is critical when someone is having a heart attack. Please “Share” so that our friends, our families and our communities are aware of the warning signs of a heart attack.

Heart attacks often start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Sometimes people affected aren't even sure what's wrong and may wait too long before getting help. Here are the most common warning signs of a heart attack:

·         Chest discomfort - Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest. The feeling usually lasts for more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back. It can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain. It also can feel like heartburn or indigestion. The discomfort can be mild or severe.

·         Upper body discomfort -  You may feel pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, shoulders, neck, jaw, or upper part of the stomach (above the belly button).

·         Shortness of breath - This may be your only symptom, or it may occur before or along with chest pain or discomfort. It can occur when you are resting or doing mild physical activity.

·         Other signs can include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

 

Chest pain or discomfort that doesn't go away or changes from its usual pattern could be a sign of a heart attack. All chest pain should be checked by a doctor. If you or someone you know is experiencing these warning signs, call 911 immediately!

 

Did you know….that men over the age of 55 have a significantly higher chance of having a heart attack or fatal coronary heart disease than those that are younger? It’s important to know your heart numbers.

 

Do you know...blood sugar levels, blood pressure, cholesterol, BMI and waistline?

Blood sugar: A1c should be less than 5.7%

Blood pressure: less than 120 over 80

Cholesterol: less than 200mb/dL

BMI: Normal weight 18.5 - 24.9

Waistline: Men - less than 40 inches, Women - less than 35 inches

 

If your critical numbers are not at the target level, work with your healthcare provider to develop a plan to reach these goals. If you do not have a cardiologist, you can make an appointment with a cardiologist at Hannibal Regional Medical Group by calling 573-629-3300.



Here are 12 Risk Factors for Developing Heart Disease
Cardiology Hannibal, MOWhile many of the risk factors for heart disease listed below are well known, some may surprise you.  Read through the list and see how many apply to you. If you have more than a couple, then it may be time to see a cardiologist and find out what you can do to reduce your risk. 


Risk factors for developing heart disease include:

  • Age. Aging increases your risk of damaged and narrowed arteries, as well as weakened or thickened heart muscle.
  • Gender. Men are generally at greater risk of heart disease. However, women's risk increases after menopause.
  • Family history. A family history of heart disease increases your risk of coronary artery disease, especially if a parent developed it at an early age (before age 55 for a male relative, such as your brother or father, and 65 for a female relative, such as your mother or sister).
  • Smoking. Nicotine constricts your blood vessels, and carbon monoxide can damage their inner lining, making them more susceptible to atherosclerosis. Heart attacks are more common in smokers than in non-smokers.
  • Poor diet. A diet that's high in fat, salt, sugar and cholesterol can contribute to the development of heart disease.
  • High blood pressure. Uncontrolled high blood pressure can result in hardening and thickening of your arteries, narrowing the vessels through which blood flows.
  • High cholesterol levels. High levels of cholesterol in your blood can increase the risk of formation of plaques and atherosclerosis.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease. Both conditions share similar risk factors, such as obesity and high blood pressure.
  • Obesity. Excess weight typically worsens other risk factors.
  • Physical inactivity. Lack of exercise also is associated with many forms of heart disease and some of its other risk factors as well.
  • Stress. Unrelieved stress may damage your arteries and worsen other risk factors for heart disease.
  • Poor hygiene. Not regularly washing your hands and not establishing other habits that can help prevent viral or bacterial infections can put you at risk of heart infections, especially if you already have an underlying heart condition. Poor dental health also may contribute to heart disease.
     
    Heart disease, detected early, can be improved — or even prevented — by making certain lifestyle changes. Call today and make an appointment to see a cardiologist in a heartbeat. Hannibal Regional Medical Group’s Cardiology Team accepts patients in a heartbeat because we put patients first. No referral needed. When it comes to matters of the heart, our compassion and clinical expertise go hand in hand. We believe in guiding you to BETTER.
     
    If you are concerned about your risk for heart disease, Call 573-629-3300, to schedule your appointment with a cardiologist.

New Doctors at Hannibal Regional
The Hannibal Regional Healthcare System is excited to welcome four new physicians to the Hannibal Regional Medical Group. As part of the Hannibal Regional Healthcare System, the Hannibal Regional Medical Group is a growing multi-specialty physician group continuing to expand primary and specialty care services to meet the health needs of northeast Missouri. With 42 providers including physicians and nurse practitioners, we offer services ranging from general family practice to specialized medical needs. Our dedication to guiding you to better keeps us growing and expanding our expertise through finding new physicians that are highly competent in their fields. Our newest physicians will be joining our Pulmonology, and Internal Medicine specialties this June. 

Sivatej Sarva, MDSivatej Sarva, M.D., Ph.D.

“I come from a small coal mining town in south India. Resources were inadequate for the management of many lung diseases like tuberculosis, COPD and lung cancer which were common in our town,” Dr. Sarva explained to us. “Many of my childhood friends became coal miners because the bread earners in their family were already sick and the burden of supporting their family fell on them too early. Because of seeing these circumstances, I spent all of my life working towards becoming an expert in treating these lung problems which are not limited to my home town but prevalent in communities across the world. Every day I treat a patient and make them breathe better, I feel like I have not only made the quality of life of that patient better but also helped in reducing the emotional and financial burden of a family. That's why I love what I do and wake up every day excited to meet patients and their families.” Sivatej Sarva received his Ph. D. in Molecular Sciences from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in 2008. He then went on to participate in a rotating fellowship in Mycobacterial and Respiratory Infectious Diseases in 2009 at National Jewish Health in Denver, Colorado. From there, Dr. Sarva practiced in a fellowship in Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine from 2011 - 2014. He is board certified in Pulmonary Medicine as well as Critical Care Medicine. He will be accompanying Dr. Pranav Parikh, M.D., in Pulmonology. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Sarva, call (573) 629-3400.

Hassan Behniay, MDHassan Behniay, M.D.

Dr. Hassan completed his undergraduate magna cum laude from the University of Toledo, and completed his medical schooling from the University of Toledo Medical Center.  After finishing  his residency in 2009, he then went on to practice at the Family Health Centers in Kentucky and Mississippi. “Visiting the Hannibal community, I found it nice, friendly, and a quiet environment to raise my young children, far from the anxiety and problems of a big city,” Dr. Hassan told us. He also stated, “I have joined the Hannibal Regional Medical Group with great excitement because I found it an updated and well-equipped organization, with excellent supporting staff. This helped to show me my ultimate potential as a physician to have a positive impact on the health of the Hannibal community in general. Through various preventive health care and services at Hannibal Regional Hospital, I am sure we will achieve the common goal of improved health of the Hannibal community.” While practicing here at Hannibal Regional, Dr. Hassan Behniay would prefer to be referred to as Dr. Hassan to lessen confusion between him and his older brother. He will be accompanying John Greving, DO, and Kim Peters, ANP-BC, in Internal Medicine. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Hassan, call (573) 629-3400.

Hossein Behniaye, MDHossein Behniaye, M.D.

Dr. Behniaye, graduated from medical school at the University of Toledo in 2007. From there he went on to his residency at the Toledo Hospital from 2007 - 2010. After completing his residency, Dr. Behniaye, went to practice at the Southeast Mississippi Rural Health Initiative, Inc.“As a physician I have the privilege, and with it enormous responsibility and challenge, of providing the best, the safest, the most compassionate and individualized medical care for my patient,” Dr. Behniaye explained when we asked him why he loves his profession. He went on to elaborate, “as such I could also affect the lives of my patient’s current and future generations. Such challenges, each with varying degrees of investigation and care, provide me with a fulfilling and satisfying life as it paves the road of my contribution to the betterment of humankind beyond and above my lifetime.”  He will be accompanying Adam Samaritoni, DO, and Kim Shaw, FNP-BC, in Family Practice. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Behniaye, call (573) 629-3400.

A New Meaning to Spring Cleaning

Vegetable ShoppingAfter a long winter, we often revive our home with a good spring cleaning. So why not do the same for our body with our eating habits? We all know that fruits and vegetables are good for us, yet most of us fall short of the recommended 5-9 servings per day. The simplicity of the produce section is something that no other section of the store has. Every item comes "as is", and is in its whole form. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce risk of heart disease, including heart attack and stroke, as well as protect against certain types of cancers. Fruits and vegetables are full of fiber, which helps maintain proper bowel function and reduce blood cholesterol levels. They are packed with many essential nutrients, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. The impact of fruit and vegetable consumption on our health is pretty remarkable.  Improving our eating habits can be hard, so if you currently don’t eat many fruits and vegetables, start by adding just 1 serving of a fruit and 1 serving of a vegetable to each day (1 orange with lunch, 1/2 cup sugar snap peas for a snack; ). Gradually increase the number of servings you eat per day to at least 2 fruits and 3 vegetables. Spring clean your diet by choosing more from the produce section.

 

What counts as a serving?

1 medium piece of fruit= baseball size

½ cup fresh, frozen or canned fruit

¼ cup dried fruit

½ cup 100% fruit juice

1 cup leafy greens or raw veggies

½ cup fresh, frozen or canned vegetables

½ cup 100% vegetable juice