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Our blog offers content about healthcare, healthy living and the culture at Hannibal Regional.


7 Tips For Cutting Sugar
  • Cutting SugarSatisfy your sweet tooth with fruit! Dried fruits are especially good at satisfying a sweet tooth as they contain a lot more sugar per ounce than regular fruit. Keep portion size in mind.
  • Cut back on the amount of sugar added to things you eat or drink regularly like cereal, pancakes, coffee or tea. Start by cutting the usual amount of sugar you add by half and wean down from there.
  • Try new toppings, instead of syrup on pancakes/waffles or jam on toast/muffins/baked goods, try natural nut butter, chopped fruit, dried fruit, fruit purees, and toasted nuts.
  • Eat fresh, frozen, dried or canned fruits. Choose fruit canned in water or natural juice. Avoid fruit canned in syrup, especially heavy syrup.
    Keep in mind that sugar is a treat, not an everyday food! Use white sugar, brown sugar, syrup, honey, molasses etc. as an occasional splurge.
    Compare food labels and choose products with the lowest amounts of added sugars. Dairy and fruit products will contain some natural sugars. Added sugars can be identified in the ingredients list, as mentioned last week.
  • Make more at home! Make your own marinades and salad dressing with oil and vinegar. Instead of buying pop tarts, doughnuts, cereal bars and other bakery/packaged items, make up your own muffins and sweet treats at home. This way you control the ingredients! Make a double batch and freeze to save time.
  • Cut the serving back. When baking cookies, brownies or cakes, cut the sugar called for in your recipe by one-third to one-half. OR…
    Replace it completely. Enhance the flavor of foods with spices and extracts instead of sugar. Try ginger, allspice, cinnamon or nutmeg. Use extracts like almond, vanilla, orange or lemon.
  • Substitute. Switch out sugar with unsweetened applesauce, mashed banana, date puree or any preferred fruit puree. Try using these in an equal amount as called for in recipes; take note, you may have to alter your recipes a bit!

    Blog post provided by:
    Katie Foster, RDN, LD
    Nutrition Services
    Hannibal Regional

FUN Fresh Fruit Salsa with Cinnamon Chips
SchoolFruit Salsa is right around the corner. We all know that the first thing kids do when they walk in the door is get something to eat! Make after school snacks more fun by getting them involved. Kids who are involved with choosing and preparing their after school snack are more likely to make good healthful choices. This is a great afterschool snack that is nutritionally dense and can be prepared ahead of time for a quick and fun snack. 

All you need:
2 kiwis, peeled and diced
1 Golden Delicious apple, peeled and diced
1 package (8 oz.) fresh raspberries
1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled and quartered
10 (6- inch) whole wheat tortillas
1/4 cup sugar + 1 tbsp. cinnamon

All you do: 
1.  In a large bowl, combine kiwi, apple, raspberries, strawberries and strawberry preserves.  Cover and    chill for 15 minutes.
2.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
3. Coat one side of each flour tortilla with butter spray.  Cut into wedges with pizza cutter or scissors and arrange in a single layer on baking sheets.
4. Sprinkle wedges with cinnamon sugar.  Spray again with cooking spray.
5. Bake 8-12 minutes or until crispy.  Remove from oven and cool.
6. Serve with chilled fruit mixture.

Serves 8

Nutrition Facts per serving: 
240 calories, 52 g carbohydrate, 0 mg cholesterol, 6 g dietary fiber, 3 g fat, 4 g protein, 190 mg sodium, 18 g sugar

Daily Values: 
2% vitamin A 70% vitamin C 8% calcium 10% iron

Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD 
Nutrition Services
Hannibal Regional


Happy and Healthy Holidays!
BBQ

Trying to eat a healthy diet, maintain a healthy weight and live a healthy lifestyle? You may think you are doomed with the upcoming BBQs and holiday get togethers, but no need to worry. Getting through the holidays without weight gain is do-able with a little self-motivation, realistic goals, and a PLAN! Below we have included tips to surviving the holidays without weight gain, along with a satisfying recipe, of course.


      Holiday Party Tips

 

  • Make a plan. Before you dive into every dish and dessert served up buffet style, check out your options. Decide what and how much you are going to eat. Get a plate and silverware, and then sit down while you eat.
  • Be realistic. Aim to maintain your weight during the holidays—not to lose weight. Eat small, lower-calorie meals during the day so you can enjoy some of those traditional holiday foods later.
  • Don’t arrive at the party famished. You’ll be more likely to overeat. Instead, eat a small, low fat snack such as yogurt, fruit and low-fat cheese or cottage cheese, or a half sandwich with lean meat before you head out to the party.
  • Keep the buffet trips to one. Choose the foods you just can’t live without or the ones that make the holidays so special to you. Take small portions, eat slowly and savor each bite.
  • Bring a healthy appetizer, such as a fruit tray, fresh veggies with a low-fat yogurt or cottage cheese dip, or a whole wheat tortilla roll up with lean deli meat, low-fat cheese and pickle. This ensures you have a healthy option.
  • Get enough sleep! Being sleep deprived can increase your appetite and lead to poor decision making.

    Easy Ways to Eat Less
  • Keep a food journal. It’s an easy way to become more aware of what you eat.
  • Choose the smallest plates, cups and bowls. You’ll be satisfied with less.
  • Be the last one to start eating.
  • Serve the food in the kitchen, rather than leaving it on the table- you’ll be less likely to get seconds.
  • Take small portions and wait 20 minutes before deciding to get seconds- you’ll probably still eat less than if you took a large portion and did not get seconds. (Plus, as an added bonus, you’ll flatter the cook!)
  • Keep a reminder of how much you have already eaten (such as toothpicks from your appetizers). This will help keep you from overeating.
  • Limit pre-snacking to a few hors d'oeuvres. Studies show that 10% of our holiday calories come from these pre-meal foods. Focus on socializing instead.

    Drinks to Your Health!
  • Alcoholic and holiday beverages tend to pack a ton of calories yet provide very little nutritional value. In addition, beverages rarely satisfy hunger because they leave our stomach quickly. Choose more zero-calorie drinks like water, sparkling water and diet beverages and treat other beverages, including 100% juice, as an occasional treat.
  • Instead of homemade or traditional eggnog (350 calories, 19g fat per 8oz), try this low-fat recipe: (see attached Powerpoint for recipe)
  • Try your favorite coffee house drink with non-fat milk or almond milk and no whipped topping. A 12-oz peppermint mocha with whole milk and whip has 360 calories and 16g fat where a 12-oz nonfat, no-whip peppermint mocha has only 240 calories and 2.5g fat). If you have diabetes or are watching carbohydrate intake, try using Splenda, Stevia or other type of sugar substitute to save on calories and carbohydrates. Of course, with any sweetened beverage or treat, portion and moderation is key!
  • Keep the alcoholic beverages to 1-2 drinks. This will save you empty calories and keep you healthy!

Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Nutrition Services
Hannibal Regional


Flavor Up!

Spices and HerbsSpices and herbs can help enhance and retain flavor in your foods while cutting back on dietary sugar, sodium/salt, and fat. When you start adding flavors to your foods with herbs and spices, you may be surprised at what you’ve been missing. Try the following food and flavor combinations to enhance a meal.

For meat, poultry, and fish, try one or more of these combinations:

Beef: Bay leaf, marjoram, nutmeg, onion, pepper, sage, thyme

Lamb: Curry powder, garlic, rosemary, mint

Pork: Garlic, onion, sage, pepper, oregano

Veal: Bay leaf, curry powder, ginger, marjoram, oregano

Fish: Curry powder, dill, dry mustard, marjoram, paprika, pepper, turmeric

Chicken: Ginger, marjoram, oregano, paprika, poultry seasoning, rosemary, sage, tarragon, thyme, anise seeds


For vegetables, experiment with one or more of these combinations:

Carrots: Cinnamon, cloves, dill, ginger, marjoram, nutmeg, rosemary, sage

Corn: Cumin, curry powder, onion, paprika, parsley

Green Beans: Dill, curry powder, marjoram, oregano, tarragon, thyme

Greens: Onion, pepper

Potatoes: Dill, garlic, onion, paprika, parsley, sage

Summer Squash: Cloves, curry powder, marjoram, nutmeg, rosemary, sage, allspice

Winter Squash: Cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, onion

Tomatoes: Basil, bay leaf, dill, marjoram, onion, oregano, parsley, pepper


Tips:

  • 1 tablespoon of fresh herb = 1 teaspoon of dried herb.
  • If you are creating your own recipe, begin by trying one or two spices or herbs. The amount to add varies with the type of spice or herb, type of recipe, and preference.
  • When doubling a recipe, do not double spices and herbs only increase by 1½ times. Always taste and adjust by preference
  • There are many, many varieties of spices and herbs. Begin to experiment and find new flavors.

Blog post provided by:

Katie Foster, RDN, LD

Nutrition Services

Hannibal Regional



Tips for Adding Fiber to Your Eating Plan
Foods High In FiberWanting to get some more fiber in your diet? Consider these simple tips:
• Slowly increase the amount of fiber you eat to 25 to 35 grams per day.
• Check the Nutrition Facts labels and try to choose products with at least 3 g dietary fiber per serving.
• Compare food labels of similar foods to find higher fiber choices. On packaged foods, the amount of fiber per serving is listed on the Nutrition Facts label.
• Choose fresh fruit and vegetables (skin on!) instead of juices.
• Have brown or wild rice instead of white rice.
• Eat the skin when having potatoes.
• Enjoy a variety of grains. Good choices include barley, oats, farro, kamut, and quinoa. • • Look for choices with 100% whole wheat, rye, oats, or bran as the first or second ingredient. Popcorn is another good choice (air-popped or lightly buttered)!
• When baking, use whole wheat pastry flour. You can use it to replace some white or all-purpose flour in recipes.
• Enjoy beans more often! Batch cook dried beans and freeze in smaller portions, then add to casseroles, soups/stews, taco meat, pasta salad and salads. Beans also make a great finger food for babies (age appropriate).
• Drink plenty of fluids. Fluid helps your body process fiber without discomfort.


Blog post provided by:
Katie Foster, RDN, LD
Nutrition Services
Hannibal Regional

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